WEST GRIMSTEAD VILLAGE HALL
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Centenary of W.W.1 1914-2014

West Grimstead Remembering the First World War.

100yrs ago.          1914 – 2014.

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To commemorate the Centenary our local Play Reading Group masterminded a Play called “The Lads in their Hundreds” and performed it for the Village.

 

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The Play Group excelled in putting on a sad and sometimes humourous entertainment with songs we all knew and could join in. It was a lovely evening and made us all very grateful that we are now living in a time of Peace.

 

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(Click on a photo below to see the full size image.)

 

Memories of the First world war in West Grimstead Village.

We invite you to send us your memories of any family members, neighbours, etc, that you would be willing to share on our website. Do you know what happened in our village during this war?

We look forward to hearing from you!

 

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Here is another link to the Village WW1 information (via http://wiltshire-opc.org.uk/genealogy/)

http://wiltshire-opc.org.uk/genealogy/index.php/parish-directory/item/62-west-grimstead  

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FOR THOSE OF YOU WHO COULDN’T GET TO LONDON TO SEE THE AMAZING SEA OF POPPIES AROUND THE TOWER OF LONDON, HERE ARE A FEW PHOTOS OF THE EVENT:

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WW1 CENTENARY ANNIVERSARY  AT THE TOWER OF LONDON.

For WWI Anniversary, the Tower of London became surrounded by Ceramic Poppies.

For over 170 years, the moat around the Tower of London has run dry—but this summer, in honour of the 100th anniversary of the beginning of World War I, visitors to the Tower were met by a vast bed of blood-red poppies. Beginning August 5, 100 years to the day after Britain’s declaration of war on Germany, volunteers  periodically planted the ceramic flowers in the Towers’ moat. The final one being placed on November 11, another symbolic date that commemorates the Armistice agreement that ended the war in 1918. All told, 888,246 poppies flooded the Tower’s moat, equaling the number of British and Colonial soldiers who perished in the war.

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The project, titled Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red, comes from the creative minds of ceramic artist Paul Cummins and stage designer Tom Piper. Cummins, who specializes in ceramic flowers, made each poppy by hand, a painstaking process which required around-the-clock work. Piper has been a designer with the Royal Shakespeare Company since 2004.
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The exhibition’s title, Cummins notes, came from the final words of a British solider who lost his life in Flanders. “I don’t know his name or where he was buried or anything about him,” reported Cummins.  “But this line he wrote, when everyone he knew was dead and everywhere around him was covered in blood, jumped out at me:’The blood-swept lands and seas of red, where angels fear to tread.’ I believe he meant the angels to refer to his children.”
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HORSES are remembered also.

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Getty_110614_TowerOfLondonPoppiesOnce the installation was taken down in November, each individual poppy was available for purchase for £25 (roughly $42) and proceeds split among six different charities.

Even before World War I, the poppy served as a symbol of life, death and rebirth, as their seeds can be buried in the Earth for years without blooming.

The flowers only emerge when soil is churned and the seeds are brought closer to the surface. After the Napoleonic wars tore through Europe in the early 19th century, for example, fields of poppies sprung up over battlefields across the continent.

In 1914, when fighting and explosive warfare again devastated lands through Europe, the flowers could be seen blooming anew, famously appearing in the fields around Flanders, an area of intense fighting near the Belgium/France border.

 

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Did you know that there are differnt coloured poppies for specific causes related to war?

 

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The original White Poppy made just after the first world war by the widows and women’s co-operative guild, was the original PEACE symbol.

 

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We sometimes forget that Animals that were used to help us in the War, especially the First World War, homing pigeons, Horses and Dogs. The Purple Poppy is a way of remembering them.

 

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MAKE LOVE NOT WAR.